How do you pronounce “Fionnuala”?

It’s pronounced “Fi-nu-la”!

What can Osteopathy help?

Osteopathy can help relieve any musculoskeletal problem, in people of all ages. Musculoskeletal conditions include back pain, sciatica, neck pain, headaches, hip problems, knee problems, arthritis, shoulder pain, to mention but a few.
If you also have other health problems, your osteopath will advise you to seek appropriate medical guidance. It is possible to have osteopathic treatment as well as conventional medical treatment. The osteopath will be able to advise you on this.

What does 'musculoskeletal' mean?

Musculoskeletal means all the muscles, all the skeleton and everything else connected to it. So that includes the nerves, ligaments, tendons, joints, spine and neck, arms, legs and head. Basically it’s all of you except your internal organs!
Your musculoskeletal system is affected by your posture, how you hold yourself, how you move, your daily activities and any injuries or illnesses you have had. It’s your whole body, it is involved in how you do everything in your life.
Sciatica, trapped nerves, slipped discs, arthritis, frozen shoulder, repetitive strain injury (RSI), any joint problems – things like these are all musculoskeletal conditions.
Musculoskeletal is often abbreviated to MSK, for example in the NHS if you see your GP for back pain, you may be referred to an MSK clinic. Osteopathy is private treatment for musculoskeletal (MSK) conditions, outside the NHS.

Is Osteopathy right for me?

Osteopathic treatment is tailored to each individual person’s needs and circumstances. At the first appointment we go through everything which might be relevant to the problems you are having. The Osteopath always has time to discuss this with you to ensure that you are getting what you need.
If you are not sure about whether osteopathy would be right for you, call us and we can talk through your concerns, or you book in for a free brief appointment (with no obligation and no treatment).

Do I need referral from my GP?

No, although you may chose to consult your GP as well. The osteopath might advise you to see your GP or might contact your GP, with your permission, if that is necessary. Osteopathy is private treatment, outside of the NHS.

Is Osteopathy expensive?

Osteopathy is a lot more affordable than you might expect, and excellent value for money.
There is no waiting list, you can make your appointments at a time that suits you. Each appointment is between 30mins and an hour long, so there is plenty of time, alongside treatment, to discuss everything that is relevant to your problem, such as work activities, exercise advice, other health issues, even lifestyle and nutrition. They are all relevant to your health.
You and your osteopath have time to get to know each other and find what works best for you. Treatment is tailored to your needs. Concession fees are available for those on low income. You can contact your osteopath directly whenever you need to. 

Can I claim on Health Insurance?

Many health insurance policies will allow you claim part of the cost of osteopathic treatment – check with your insurers to see if you are covered. We can give you receipts for your treatment fees to use in your claim.

What is involved in a treatment session?

The first consultation session consists of a full medical history and examination, and usually treatment.
Follow up sessions focus on hands-on treatment. Advice on posture, exercise and relaxation is also usually given.
The initial consultation session lasts an hour, treatment sessions last half an hour. Most people have between two and six sessions, some people continue to have treatment at intervals, as necessary.
Take a look at the What to expect‘ page for more details.

What should I wear?

The most important thing is that you feel comfortable and relaxed. An osteopath needs to assess how you hold yourself, and also needs to see your mobility in simple movements such as bending forward or back, side to side, and turning left or right.
Osteopaths usually ask patients to undress to their underwear during examination and treatment, but if you prefer not to undress then wear something light such as a vest top and shorts.

What's the difference between an Osteopath, a Physio and a Chiropractor?

This is a question we are often asked – so there is a whole blog post devoted to the answer.
Read more…